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Build Your Brand With Facebook Business Marketing

13 Nov

Facebook is a wonderful way to grow your brand, create brand awareness and attract and engage with customers, but if your primary reason for creating a Facebook business page is because other companies have one, you need to stop and think more strategically. Marketing on Facebook is a completely different entity compared to a general Facebook profile. Learn how to make the most out of Facebook for your business with these helpful tips.

Keep Your Facebook Business Page Updated

You may think people don’t pay attention to your Facebook business page’s description or category, but that’s not the case. Providing essential business information on your page and using brand keywords will not only make it look professional but will help customers know they found the right business page. Make sure business hours, location and logos are in sync with other marketing material — any discrepancies will create confusion.

Make Your Page Worth Their Like Or Follow

This may sound odd, but a page like is no longer the golden nugget it used to be. Once Facebook incorporated its new news feed algorithm in 2013, Facebook likes lost value. Page likes may inflate your vanity stats, but it doesn’t mean your content will reach more people. Make your content valuable to Facebook fans by offering exclusive deals, giveaways and contests. Make your fans feel like they’re going to miss out on something great if they don’t like or follow your page.

Incorporating Facebook Live into your marketing strategy is a great way to boost the appeal of your page. This is a great opportunity to provide exclusive content, engagement with fans and consumers, behind-the-scenes footage, product launches and more.

Facebook Advertising

Facebook has incorporated many functions to help brands get sales, including a “Shop Now” button. The challenge is, your sale conversions may be low depending on your brand. Not everybody that clicks on your ad will make a purchase. That would be nice, but you have to be realistic in your expectations

Optimize your sales funnel by testing different ads and layouts, but don’t overlook the fact that prospecting customers want to buy immediately. Don’t have them go through hoops to get the product they want. The easier the process, the more likely a sale will be completed.

A better ROI can be achieved by promoting products that you already know sells. Did you promote a product that performed well in email marketing or a website promotion? Transfer that product to Facebook and target your core audience and those with similar interests or behaviors. Not only will this help increase sales, it can also bring in new customers.

Does Your Brand Have A Personality?

People want to connect to a brand but more so on a personal level. Your goal should be to create a community where people can learn, engage and share your brand. If you’re too corporate and salesy, there will be a disconnect. If your brand allows you to be whimsical, give it a try. Consumers are marketed to on a daily basis and can only consume so much of the advertising thrown their way. Give their eyes a break from sales pitches. Incorporate fun consumable branded content like memes, GIFs and short videos.

Quality Over Quantity

Your Facebook business page’s reach has declined over the last week. You may be tempted to boost it by increasing the number of posts on your page. This may temporarily increase your reach, but are you posting quality content or are you posting content for the sake of numbers?

Based on our findings, the most common reason for fans to unlike a brand’s page is because they post uninteresting content; the second most common reason is that they share too much content. Many businesses feel they have to post obsessively on their Facebook business page to be seen by consumers. The average user spends nearly an hour on Facebook. Combine that with the unknown amount of content from their friends and other pages they follow decreases the visibility of your posts exponentially.

Make sure your content is interesting, informative and shareable. If your posts lack quality, your fans will not like, comment or share which will organically increase your reach. When people engage with quality content, this tells Facebook your content is valuable and will more likely be seen by more people.

Experiment with posts and determine your brand’s sweet spot. Once you figure out what your audience responds well to, work around that content to achieve quality numbers.

Facebook is one of the most popular social networks around the world. There is no one-size-fits-all method for businesses, but grasping the core of Facebook for business is a great foundation for developing an effective and powerful Facebook presence.

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Beyond Google and Facebook: 4 Reasons to Look at Other Online Marketing Channels

2 Jan

As people search for brands across multiple channels, the complexity of targeting right customers with right messages is greater than ever before. Digital advertisers have relied on web cookies since the last two decades, but with the advent of smart mobility, this old strategy won’t work. Brands need to connect with consumers directly and then measure every campaign outcome, to appeal to different platforms.

While Google is still the search engine leader, Bing is surging ahead in grabbing search engine market share, while Yahoo! Is trying to recover lost ground with its new services. In social media marketing, it is essential that businesses think beyond Facebook for better results too, as other social sites are making headway in various demographics.

Analysts believe that advertisers should apply sound marketing strategies on sites other than Google and Facebook, since people-based marketing is quickly moving beyond what these tech giants have created. Leveraging Facebook and Google’s success, one can find that by relying on “people-based” solutions, advertisers can devise ads for real people and not some stored cookies.

Advertisers will now dive deeply in addressable media, to utilize people-based targeting outside Facebook across multiple publisher sites. Top digital marketers, including GSK, Nestle and Reebok, have expressed the need to spend on addressable advertising and work beyond closed ecosystems, without limiting their presence.

Here are four reasons why marketers should look for alternative online marketing channels:

Google has introduced high cost-per-clicks on paid search

In terms of costs involved, some courses are expensive to market on Google Paid Search. Google CPCs increased by 23 percent year-over-year while Bing saw a jump of 15 percent in the same period. But Google costs have been way higher than Bing costs. Google Paid Search needs better cost per conversion ratio, too, and Bing is definitely a worthy option.

Bing’s Search market share has risen considerably

As mentioned earlier, Bing has increased its limited market share considerably. The most recent comScore Search Share report revealed that Bing boosted its market share in U.S. to more than 21 percent, last December. Google has garnered about 64 percent of the market in the same period. This means that marketers need to address the void, and pay attention to Bing for a rounded view of the process.

Paid social sites are providing better opportunities

Paid social marketing is touted as a highly cost-effective way to drive awareness about new ideas and offerings. Other social networks besides Facebook, like LinkedIn, Instagram and Twitter, deserve equal importance nowadays since they offer cost-effective options to derive leads. These “awareness” platforms are now “ROI” platforms, owing to their reach and demographic targeting abilities. Social media functions work very well for sponsored ads, and organic social media marketing also boosts the overall value of paid marketing.

The digital ecosystem binds all elements

The digital world includes several components that interact with one another, so marketing across multiple avenues within the online ecosystem should be a topmost priority for marketers today. For example, display marketing has been a major factor in the rise of paid and organic search traffic to a variety of websites. Twitter has a strong business following because of its real-time messaging ability.

It is time to go beyond the oft-used channels and use those best practices on other chosen platforms. One can adopt the ‘custom audience’ approaches that have helped in Facebook and Google marketing for even better ROI.

Why Your Facebook Ads May Not Be Converting

15 Nov

You’ve spent hours optimizing your Facebook Ads.

You’re getting a higher click-through-rate and lower CPM costs than you’ve ever had.

But no one is converting on your landing page.

So what’s the problem?

In this article I’ll dissect the top 3 reasons why people click on your Facebook Ads, but don’t convert. And how to fix each problem.

Let’s begin.

1. Your Landing Page doesn’t use the same image/copy as your Ad

When a person clicks on your Ad, they have a general expectation of what they’re going to see when they are directed to your landing page. This expectation stems ENTIRELY from what you show them in the Ad. So if the Ad you show them on Facebook looks completely different than your landing page, you’re going to confuse people – confusion leads to drop-offs and a low conversion rate.

There are two things that you need to match up between your Facebook Ad and your landing page to minimize confusion as much as possible: imagery and copy.

Imagery

More than anything, I recommend using the same image on your landing page as you do in your Facebook Ad – just a larger version, of course. This can cause some issues for certain images, as the max pixel size of a right-side Facebook Ad is 100 x 72 px, while you’ll probably use dimensions upwards of 400 px for the image on your landing page. So you need to find an image that works in both sizes.

One other important piece to note is the color of the Ad image. Do your best to use the same color template in both the Ad and your landing page. This will make your landing page seem like a direct extension of your Ad, which will decrease confusion and mistrust in your visitors, causing them to convert more.

Copy

Now, to perfect the transition from Ad to landing page, it’s vital to use the same copy on both. Your Facebook Ad, especially if in the right-side column, will require much shorter text than you can utilize on your landing page. So for the Facebook Ad headline, I would recommend using a shortened version of the main title on your landing page.

One element of the copy that NEEDS to match between the Ad and the landing page is the call-to-action. If your Ad’s call-to-action is “Get the Free Ebook”, it should be the exact same on the landing page.

2. Your Landing Page Is Taking Too long to Load

Just as the copy and imagery of your landing page are important, the speed at which it loads is just as important. The longer it takes your landing page to load, the lower your conversion rate will be. That’s a fact. Studies by Amazon have shown that a page load slowdown of just one second could cost it $1.6 billion in sales each year. For Google, slowing its search results by just four tenths of a second they could lose 8 million searches per day.

These examples magnify the results of slow webpages quite a bit – but even if your business is much smaller than Amazon and Google, slow load speeds on your landing pages will hurt you a lot.

To alleviate this pain, let’s take a look at a few things that may be causing your page to load slowly and how to alleviate them.

Tips to Decrease the Load Time of your Landing Pages

Decrease the number of images: Images are incredibly “heavy” (meaning they take a long time to load). Whereas text and the page’s background color are extremely light. So if you see that you are using a lot of images to help explain the points of your landing page, try to replace them as much as possible with description text. And if you need them to stand out, use a different font or background color instead of an image.

Lower the file sizes of your images: When you’ve narrowed down the number of images to an absolute minimum, you can look at decreasing their file sizes. This can be done in two ways, either by decreasing the dimensions of the image or decreasing the quality.

Move all Javascript below the tag: If you have any pop-up windows, analytics tracking codes or fancy animations on your landing page, then you have Javascript. Similar to images, Javascript is heavy. So what can you do to alleviate the load? Move it to the very bottom of the landing page, below the tag. This will allow your server to load the visual elements of your landing page first, so visitors can quickly begin viewing the page, while the tracking codes and pop-ups, that users either don’t interact with or interact with after reading the page, load in the background.

3. Too Many Form Fields

A large form can be daunting to even the most interested person. Especially if the form fields in it ask them questions that they need to think about before answering. Asking a person for their first name is one thing, but asking for their favorite brand of running shoes will require them to stop and think. This is exactly what you DON’T want to make a person do. act with.

So what is the right amount of form fields to have?

Well, that depends on the requirements of your sales or marketing teams. If your sales team absolutely needs to know certain things, such as industry and marketing budget to accurately prepare for a product demonstration, then you need to ask for it. Or if your marketing team’s email marketing automation campaigns need to have personalized merge tags for the company name and address, then you need to ask for it.

Just don’t add in anything that doesn’t NEED to be there. When someone on your team asks for a field to be added to your form, make sure it is 100% necessary before you add it. Unless you’re going to use it in an automated email, you don’t need to ask for a person’s last name. Unless your sales team plans to call every lead that you get from your landing pages, you don’t need to ask for a phone number.

It’s important to realize that not every form on every landing page needs to ask the same things. Only some fields are relevant. This depends a lot on where this batch of leads is in the sales cycle. If it will be the first time they are interacting with your company, and they just want to download an ebook you’re offering, you don’t need to care about any sales information. Because at this point they are unlikely to respond well to any kind of sales call or message from your company. So you can save those fields for future landing pages.