Archive | April, 2015

5 Ways to Use Data to Inform Your Social Media Marketing Strategy

27 Apr

Being data focused can help support your intuition as a marketer and ensure your efforts are reaping results for your business. The same logic applies to your social media presence as data can highlight what’s working and what isn’t on each channel you’re active on.

These tips will by no means be an exhaustive list; rather, they will point you towards a host of free tools and techniques that will allow you to begin experimenting with data in your social media marketing efforts.

Combine Link-Tagging With Advanced Segments to Analyze Social Behavior

Anyone who has experience with social media marketing understands that the idea of “social media” as an inclusive whole doesn’t really exist. The sheer amount and differences between various social networks make it nearly impossible to treat social media as one distinct entity.

After all, you might be looking at the same person’s accounts across “social media,” but the behavior associated with their Facebook will vary wildly from their behavior on LinkedIn. This is why choosing the right social network is so crucial.

As if social media wasn’t complicated enough on its own, once marketing enters the equation it forces you to analyze and predict how a user of a certain social platform will behave once they make it on to your site or interact with your product.

Truthfully, predicting how a user from any given platform will interact with your content is almost impossible until you have lots of data to work with.

Luckily, there is a relatively simple and free technique that will allow you to pinpoint which network your traffic is coming from and begin to measure and analyze how that unique traffic behaves.

This tactic actually utilizes two separate tools, the first of which is Google URL Builder. As outlined in this fantastic video by KISSmetrics, Google URL Builder is a great free tool that allows you to assign various identifying information to any link to your website for viewing in Google Analytics.

What link-tagging will allow you to do is to append different identifying information to the same link depending on where it’s place (to clarify, this is done manually). You can see how this begins to solve the problem of getting a sense of how different users on different platforms behave.

You can take the same exact link, add unique UTM parameters to it and see how different people react based on whether they came from Facebook, Twitter, AdWords, etc. Even better is that Google Analytics will automatically add this data to your reporting to see which source converts the most, which provides the most engaged visitors and more.

To take this even one step further you can utilize Google Analytic’s Advanced Segments tool to cross-reference and analyze these tagged links even further.

Google’s segmenting options are truly staggering, but just some of the things they can allow you to do is to funnel all the UTM’d links from one campaign into a single segment and then allow you to determine the behavior based on such categories as first-time vs. returning users, age-range and demographic make-up, what types of technology they were using and a lot more based on the sharing of links around a single or multiple campaigns.

Suddenly, just using two free tools, the very complicated mess of data coming from your social networks can start to come into focus and you can begin to tease out actionable insights from this information as long as you’ve got a few specific goals in mind that you’re trying to analyze against.

Use Google’s Content Experiments to Run Consistent A/B Tests

One of the most valuable tools in a social media marketer’s arsenal are A/B tests. These kinds of tests allow you to isolate specific variables and to quickly and reliably pinpoint what works.

In my previous post I gave multiple examples of large companies that utilize split-testing to great effect. However, in all likelihood, major brands like BuzzFeed and Refinery29 are running fairly sophisticated and frequent tests on their properties, which isn’t the approach every business needs to take on their own website.

Worry not though, Google Analytics comes to the rescue yet again and provides all users of their free tool the ability to quickly and (relatively) easily set up A/B tests of their own.

All you need to do to carry out your own A/B tests is to set up one or two variations of your page (for the sake of controlled experiments, keep these changes minimal) and to set up a goal for these pages (say a click on a sign-up button, the download of a resource or a conversion) and Google Analytics will take care of the rest.

They will automatically redirect a predetermined percentage of your audience to all the variations you set up and will gather and analyze the results.

This feature can greatly impact your social media marketing because it allows you a quick, versatile and easily repeatable way of testing landing-pages and other additional touch-points impact on the experience visitors from social media are having on your website.

Perhaps the biggest hurdle that social marketers face is how to seamlessly direct users off of social platforms and on to their site with as little friction as possible. The ability to test and optimize these touch-points to minimize friction can be a major boon for maximizing your social strategy’s effectiveness.

Leverage Facebook Insights to Discover Optimal Posting Volume

One of the most robust analytics tools available to marketers besides Google Analytics is Facebook’s Insights tool.

Although it is relatively new compared to Google Analytics, Facebook’s developers have been expanding functionality like crazy and in the process have been giving its savvier users access to reams of valuable data.

Not only does Facebook’s ad product allow for a great degree of information about your promoted posts, it can actually tell you a lot about every single piece of content you share. Even more useful is the in-built ability to take this accumulated data and export it to a spreadsheet that can be analyzed in Excel.

Having access to this data and analyzing it can yield some pretty crucial insights. One key question that nearly every social marketer has is “how many times per day should I be posting?”

This topic has been written, and analyzed to death. However, all of these figures can only be averages at best, and social media best practices will likely vary for your business based off your audience and industry.

Facebook’s Insights tool can give you a much more precise picture of your ideal posting volume using a few easy steps. The first of these steps is to go to your “Overview” tab within Facebook insights and you should see an “export” option. Choose post data as your data type and decide upon a date range of your choosing.

From here, you can download your data in a spreadsheet-ready format and then open it in a program like Excel to analyze your data. To determine your ideal posting volume group the posts by day and compare the data averages in the “Lifetime Post Impressions” and the “Lifetime Engaged Users” columns.

When you are looking at this daily information you will notice that your user engagement will increase on days you posted more, but will do so only up until a certain point. The days that you posted more than your audience was willing to interact with will actually show a downswing in engagement.

The ideal posting volume for your page will be the number of posts at which user engagement just began to dip.

Use Facebook’s Conversion Pixel for Cross-Device Tracking

No picture of social media marketing is complete without taking mobile into account.Over 60% of all social media activity occurs on a mobile device.

The problem is that casual mobile use is much less likely to directly lead to the conversions that are at the center of marketer’s focus. However, even though mobile social ads drive different results from users than desktop Facebook ads, they may nudge the user to buy in the long-run.

Such multi-click attribution modeling has been a thorn in social media marketer’s sides for quite a while, and has made the task of monetizing mobile very tricky. With that being said (and with millions of potential ad dollars at stake), Facebook has recently devised a way to track purchases across devices.

In order for Facebook’s cross-device tracking to work you must install a Facebookconversion pixel on to any pages whose conversions you are aiming to track.

Once you have installed the pixel, then any ad that you run that points to a tagged page will have report generated that not only tracks the regular likes, reach and engagement; the report will also generate in-depth information about the journey a converted customer took from the time they clicked your ad all the way up until they made a purchase.

Facebook’s statistics already show that nearly one third of users who show interest in a mobile ad will later convert on desktop. Figures like this can help give you a much more accurate picture of how successful your social advertising actually is at driving results.

Without this kind of attribution, all of these assisted conversions might have been getting credited to another channel a user last clicked on before taking an action, and you would be getting a flawed impression that your social media marketing wasn’t working or was having a different level of impact.

Such an error can rob you of just as much revenue as spending money on ads that aren’t working, so I cannot stress the importance of taking the time to do this.

Combine Conversion Data With Social Segments to Determine ROI

One common critique of social media marketing is that it is far-removed from the bottom line, but in reality it is just hard to measure. However, just because social ROI is difficult to quantify doesn’t mean there is no value to social media marketing (in fact the opposite is often the case) but what it does mean is that you have to get inventive with how you weigh this important metric.

While there are a few paid tools that can help you measure your social ROI, combining a few of the free tactics we have outlined above can help you arrive at a rough idea (by no means exact) of your social ROI without investing in any costly tool.

The first necessary step in this process is to find out the approximate value of a visit from social, which you can do using link-tagging and segments.

For example if 1% of all FB visitors converts on a set goal of a campaign, and the average revenue of that goal is $50.00 then the average FB visitor value is $0.50.

Once you have that number you can look at your FB ad insights and see how much it cost to get a single click and determine if that click cost more or less than $0.50. If it cost less, keep on spending until either the average value of the visitor goes down or the average acquisition cost goes up.

There are certainly ways to get more granular with this number (for example, working cross-device tracking into your measurements), but just having a rough idea will put you leaps and bounds ahead of the competition and will also help steer you clear of any significant wastes of time, money and energy.

The techniques listed here are by no means an exhaustive list, but they should help demonstrate the types of tools at your disposal and the various capabilities they give for data-driven social media marketers who are willing to leverage them.

As you continue your path towards becoming a data-driven marketer, stay focused on constantly working with tools like these to develop new insights and to test your assumptions. If you are diligent with your implementation, you will quickly realize the benefits of incorporating data into your social media marketing.

Setting Yourself Up for Social Media Marketing Success

20 Apr

Social media marketing is an excellent way to reach and engage with your customers, clients and patients. It can be low cost (but do not delude yourself or believe anyone who represents that it is free – even if you do it yourself, your time is money!) and can be an easy addition to your marketing efforts, especially if you are familiar and comfortable with social media. Here are 7 tips to set yourself up for Social Media Marketing success.

1. Be prepared

If the extent of your digital knowledge begins and ends with checking your email on AOL, take some time to learn more about how social media works before you attempt to use social media for marketing. Take a class, attend a webinar or set up a one-on-one training session to get a better understanding of how social media works and more importantly, how marketing via social media differs from traditional marketing efforts. Social media platforms should NOT be treated as just broadcast outlets. I find that many seasoned business owners initially see social media as yet another place to put their ‘ads’. That approach is NOT going to set you up for social media marketing success! Social media requires engagement and the sharing of content of value with your community. Many of those same seasoned business owners have spent years talking with clients/customers and patients. They know the frequently asked questions and how to recommend the right product or guide someone to the correct service to address their needs. Once they understand that social media can be a way to engage like this digitally, they can thrive!

Get the help YOU need to get up to speed and prepare for success!

2. Get your digital hub ready for prime time

In addition to engagement, many of your social media marketing efforts will drive traffic to your online hub – your website and/or blog. Make sure that it is ready for traffic. If you have not recently built or redesigned your website, be sure to take some time to look at it objectively and assess it’s state. If you were to visit this site would YOU find it helpful? It is clear what products or services are offered? Would YOU buy this person’s products or services? Could you quickly and easily buy the items you wanted? Would YOU be able to easily find the address or contact information? Sometimes we are too familiar with our own websites and it can be helpful to have an outside person give you their input.

I am happy to offer a website review and to make recommendations but you can usually find a loyal customer/ client or patient to help you with this. Ask them to be honest and to offer feedback. If you have not recently rebuilt your website, your should consider a redesign which is mobile friendly. Studies show that mobile internet visits now surpass those via PC. View your site on your phone and tablet to see how mobile users will see it. Borrow devices from friends or your family members to see how it looks on devices you are not familiar with. You might be unhappily surprised but at least you will know what needs improvement!

3. Establish your goals

Be sure that you are clear on what you are trying to do. Wanting “a presence on Facebook” is not enough, especially if this is in response to an article or blog post you read about someone else’s success on Facebook. “Using Facebook to more frequently engage with my customers/clients/patients” is a goal which helps you define what you want to achieve and is something you can track. “Using Twitter to expand visibility of my blog posts” and/or “Using Pinterest to make people aware of our new product” are the types of goals we can build actionable tasks to achieve.

Social media marketing can take many many forms – being clear on your goals will help you identify the platform and community which will help you meet those goals!

4. Pick the right platforms

Picking the platform where you can best connect to YOUR target audience is key to your social media marketing success but you also need to be sure that the platform is a good fit for YOU!

If you sell life insurance, a visual platform like Pinterest or Instagram is probably not a good fit. If you are not comfortable checking your computer or phone frequently for updates, then a platform like Twitter may not be a good fit either. But if you already active on Facebook personally, managing a business page may be easy. And if you are trying to drive foot traffic to a specific location, maybe email marketing to your existing customers might be a better tactic for you, rather than using social media!

Try to ascertain where your ideal audience already IS spending time and see if that is a good fit for you. Try it out, personally at first, before setting up a business presence, to see what it is like. Many people are happily surprised when they realize that being on LinkedIn allows them to re-connect with old colleagues and friends. Some are really excited by the insights into other companies and the ability to connect with industry leaders. Check out a platform and see how it feels. If it feels too much like ‘work’, or takes too much time or effort, let’s be honest, you probably won’t be able to maintain it for the long haul. Joining a platform just because it works for someone else is never a good approach – taking the time to find a good fit will ensure your social media marketing success.

5. Be prepared to spend time on an ongoing basis

As I said above, it may not cost anything to create a social media presence but it does take TIME and as any successful business person knows, time = money! As long as you don’t plan to spend money on ads (and if you are considering a platform like Facebook, you will probably need to budget for ads in order to reach and build your community) time, whether it is your own or that of an employee or consultant, will be needed, on an ongoing basis. Creating a presence on any social platform can be done fairly quickly, especially once you have the basic bio content and imagery gathered. It is the posting and engagement which must be done regularly to BUILD and MAINTAIN your presence that can be time consuming.

I can help you streamline this process, introducing you to tools which will help you schedule postings and monitor your profiles but it IS an ongoing process. If you are thinking that you can ‘set it and forget it’, you will not succeed.

6. Be prepared to create content of value to your community>

Sharing content of value to your community, on a regular basis, should be the backbone of any social media marketing plan. Yes, you can CURATE content; finding and sharing content created by others, but you need a plan for creating content of your own as well. Often, you can extract and re-format content that you already have – brochures, catalogs, white papers or reports – so this is not as daunting. You just need to understand that pushing advertisements or fliers to these new digital platforms should not be the bulk of your content plan.

7. Focus your efforts

Diving into social media marketing can be fun and rewarding – especially if you find a fit that you enjoy and that works for your community. It can also be overwhelming and time consuming. By creating a plan and focusing on key platforms, rather than trying to have a presence on every site, you can set yourself up for social media marketing success.

Conclusion

Your social media marketing campaign is an extremely important part of your overall marketing strategy. Social media is an amazing tool that can allow you to spread the word quickly and broadly and it is important that you make it an integral part of how you go about reaching everyone you wish to reach. They will be most appreciative.

 

Social Media Marketing Tips for Local Businesses

13 Apr

So many times I’ve heard businesses — especially small businesses — say that social media just isn’t for them. It takes too much time. They’re not sure where to start or how to keep it going. And besides, they should be focusing on actually running their business –not just posting pictures online — right?

Wrong.

As social media continues to change the way people communicate, it has become an increasingly important tool for small businesses. Let’s face it: Twitter, Facebook, and LinkedIn aren’t going away. While many social media platforms began as a way to connect friends and family, it’s become the norm for all types of business to have some sort of social media presence.

In today’s connected world, customers research purchases online and seek recommendations from friends and family. So, it’s in the best interest of small businesses to have a vibrant and interactive social media presence.

The time to embrace social media is now. It’s where your customers are, so go to them! Don’t be afraid to get close to them and give them a big squeeze.

Your return on investment for a few hours a week and a few clicks of a button can be huge. You can support and grow your brand while building and maintaining relationships with current and new customers. I’ve closed hundreds of speaking events through direct messages on Twitter and Facebook. Trust me, it works.

Quality beats quantity.

You don’t have to post all the time on your social media channels. But you do want your messages to get out there on a regular basis. Still, as a general rule of thumb of what and when to post, remember this: Quality always beats quantity.

Remember that customers shop at small businesses for value. Be radically transparent. Don’t be afraid to have a personality online and keep giving your customers something to come back for. When you build your relationships, you build your business.

Focus on community.

It’s been proven by experts that social media marketing can widen your reach, help you engage more audience and create more fans. But social media isn’t like traditional advertising where you put a message out into the world and hope someone responds. It’s more conversational and centered around the idea of a community.

Social media allows small businesses to directly communicate with their customers and has the potential to turn those customers into a virtual sales team. Conversations are two-way street. Make sure you’re replying to people who interact with you on social media. Engage with strong social influencers, such as bloggers that your customers read or individuals with robust followings. Engaging the online community is core to social media and one of the keys to your success.

Consider advertising.

You’ve invested the time. Invest a little money, too. Don’t be afraid to throw a little money behind your social media efforts.

If your budget allows, put some funds toward Google AdWords to help bump your website to the top of search engine results. To do this, you’ll need a defined list of keywords that represent you and are found frequently on your website. It’s important to have both in mind so you get the best bang for your buck.

You also amplify your social media message on Facebook, Twitter and LinkedIn. You can develop very specific, targeted ads on these networks with just a few clicks. Know your audience, and you can easily promote posts, share offers, gain more followers and drive traffic to your website.

Repeat what worked.

There’s no need to reinvent the wheel. If your social media efforts were successful, repeat the steps you took to do it again. It’s that simple! And if something doesn’t work, try something else. Just keep in mind, if you incorporate a Facebook ad that didn’t work, for example, don’t ditch the idea of advertising on social media. Try it again, redefining your audience or the amount of your investment.

Social media is a marketing tool like many others small business owners can use. It’s unique in that it can heighten a company’s visibility, broaden reach and engage current and future customers. But it will only work if you do it.

5 Ways to Use Data to Inform Your Social Media Marketing Strategy

6 Apr

Being data focused can help support your intuition as a marketer and ensure your efforts are reaping results for your business. The same logic applies to your social media presence as data can highlight what’s working and what isn’t on each channel you’re active on.

These tips will by no means be an exhaustive list; rather, they will point you towards a host of free tools and techniques that will allow you to begin experimenting with data in your social media marketing efforts.

Combine Link-Tagging With Advanced Segments to Analyze Social Behavior

Anyone who has experience with social media marketing understands that the idea of “social media” as an inclusive whole doesn’t really exist. The sheer amount and differences between various social networks make it nearly impossible to treat social media as one distinct entity.

After all, you might be looking at the same person’s accounts across “social media,” but the behavior associated with their Facebook will vary wildly from their behavior on LinkedIn. This is why choosing the right social network is so crucial.

As if social media wasn’t complicated enough on its own, once marketing enters the equation it forces you to analyze and predict how a user of a certain social platform will behave once they make it on to your site or interact with your product.

Truthfully, predicting how a user from any given platform will interact with your content is almost impossible until you have lots of data to work with.

Luckily, there is a relatively simple and free technique that will allow you to pinpoint which network your traffic is coming from and begin to measure and analyze how that unique traffic behaves.

This tactic actually utilizes two separate tools, the first of which is Google URL Builder. As outlined in this fantastic video by KISSmetrics, Google URL Builder is a great free tool that allows you to assign various identifying information to any link to your website for viewing in Google Analytics.

What link-tagging will allow you to do is to append different identifying information to the same link depending on where it’s place (to clarify, this is done manually). You can see how this begins to solve the problem of getting a sense of how different users on different platforms behave.

You can take the same exact link, add unique UTM parameters to it and see how different people react based on whether they came from Facebook, Twitter, AdWords, etc. Even better is that Google Analytics will automatically add this data to your reporting to see which source converts the most, which provides the most engaged visitors and more.

To take this even one step further you can utilize Google Analytic’s Advanced Segments tool to cross-reference and analyze these tagged links even further.

Google’s segmenting options are truly staggering, but just some of the things they can allow you to do is to funnel all the UTM’d links from one campaign into a single segment and then allow you to determine the behavior based on such categories as first-time vs. returning users, age-range and demographic make-up, what types of technology they were using and a lot more based on the sharing of links around a single or multiple campaigns.

Suddenly, just using two free tools, the very complicated mess of data coming from your social networks can start to come into focus and you can begin to tease out actionable insights from this information as long as you’ve got a few specific goals in mind that you’re trying to analyze against.

Use Google’s Content Experiments to Run Consistent A/B Tests

One of the most valuable tools in a social media marketer’s arsenal are A/B tests. These kinds of tests allow you to isolate specific variables and to quickly and reliably pinpoint what works.

In my previous post I gave multiple examples of large companies that utilize split-testing to great effect. However, in all likelihood, major brands like BuzzFeed and Refinery29 are running fairly sophisticated and frequent tests on their properties, which isn’t the approach every business needs to take on their own website.

Worry not though, Google Analytics comes to the rescue yet again and provides all users of their free tool the ability to quickly and (relatively) easily set up A/B tests of their own.

All you need to do to carry out your own A/B tests is to set up one or two variations of your page (for the sake of controlled experiments, keep these changes minimal) and to set up a goal for these pages (say a click on a sign-up button, the download of a resource or a conversion) and Google Analytics will take care of the rest.

They will automatically redirect a predetermined percentage of your audience to all the variations you set up and will gather and analyze the results.

This feature can greatly impact your social media marketing because it allows you a quick, versatile and easily repeatable way of testing landing-pages and other additional touch-points impact on the experience visitors from social media are having on your website.

Perhaps the biggest hurdle that social marketers face is how to seamlessly direct users off of social platforms and on to their site with as little friction as possible. The ability to test and optimize these touch-points to minimize friction can be a major boon for maximizing your social strategy’s effectiveness.

Leverage Facebook Insights to Discover Optimal Posting Volume

One of the most robust analytics tools available to marketers besides Google Analytics is Facebook’s Insights tool.

Although it is relatively new compared to Google Analytics, Facebook’s developers have been expanding functionality like crazy and in the process have been giving its savvier users access to reams of valuable data.

Not only does Facebook’s ad product allow for a great degree of information about your promoted posts, it can actually tell you a lot about every single piece of content you share. Even more useful is the in-built ability to take this accumulated data and export it to a spreadsheet that can be analyzed in Excel.

Having access to this data and analyzing it can yield some pretty crucial insights. One key question that nearly every social marketer has is “how many times per day should I be posting?”

This topic has been written, and analyzed to death. However, all of these figures can only be averages at best, and social media best practices will likely vary for your business based off your audience and industry.

Facebook’s Insights tool can give you a much more precise picture of your ideal posting volume using a few easy steps. The first of these steps is to go to your “Overview” tab within Facebook insights and you should see an “export” option. Choose post data as your data type and decide upon a date range of your choosing.

From here, you can download your data in a spreadsheet-ready format and then open it in a program like Excel to analyze your data. To determine your ideal posting volume group the posts by day and compare the data averages in the “Lifetime Post Impressions” and the “Lifetime Engaged Users” columns.

When you are looking at this daily information you will notice that your user engagement will increase on days you posted more, but will do so only up until a certain point. The days that you posted more than your audience was willing to interact with will actually show a downswing in engagement.

The ideal posting volume for your page will be the number of posts at which user engagement just began to dip.

Use Facebook’s Conversion Pixel for Cross-Device Tracking

No picture of social media marketing is complete without taking mobile into account. Over 60% of all social media activity occurs on a mobile device.

The problem is that casual mobile use is much less likely to directly lead to the conversions that are at the center of marketer’s focus. However, even though mobile social ads drive different results from users than desktop Facebook ads, they may nudge the user to buy in the long-run.

Such multi-click attribution modeling has been a thorn in social media marketer’s sides for quite a while, and has made the task of monetizing mobile very tricky. With that being said (and with millions of potential ad dollars at stake), Facebook has recently devised a way to track purchases across devices.

In order for Facebook’s cross-device tracking to work you must install a Facebook conversion pixel on to any pages whose conversions you are aiming to track.

Once you have installed the pixel, then any ad that you run that points to a tagged page will have report generated that not only tracks the regular likes, reach and engagement; the report will also generate in-depth information about the journey a converted customer took from the time they clicked your ad all the way up until they made a purchase.

Facebook’s statistics already show that nearly one third of users who show interest in a mobile ad will later convert on desktop. Figures like this can help give you a much more accurate picture of how successful your social advertising actually is at driving results.

Without this kind of attribution, all of these assisted conversions might have been getting credited to another channel a user last clicked on before taking an action, and you would be getting a flawed impression that your social media marketing wasn’t working or was having a different level of impact.

Such an error can rob you of just as much revenue as spending money on ads that aren’t working, so I cannot stress the importance of taking the time to do this.

Combine Conversion Data With Social Segments to Determine ROI

One common critique of social media marketing is that it is far-removed from the bottom line, but in reality it is just hard to measure. However, just because social ROI is difficult to quantify doesn’t mean there is no value to social media marketing (in fact the opposite is often the case) but what it does mean is that you have to get inventive with how you weigh this important metric.

While there are a few paid tools that can help you measure your social ROI, combining a few of the free tactics we have outlined above can help you arrive at a rough idea (by no means exact) of your social ROI without investing in any costly tool.

The first necessary step in this process is to find out the approximate value of a visit from social, which you can do using link-tagging and segments.

For example if 1% of all FB visitors converts on a set goal of a campaign, and the average revenue of that goal is $50.00 then the average FB visitor value is $0.50.

Once you have that number you can look at your FB ad insights and see how much it cost to get a single click and determine if that click cost more or less than $0.50. If it cost less, keep on spending until either the average value of the visitor goes down or the average acquisition cost goes up.

There are certainly ways to get more granular with this number (for example, working cross-device tracking into your measurements), but just having a rough idea will put you leaps and bounds ahead of the competition and will also help steer you clear of any significant wastes of time, money and energy.

The techniques listed here are by no means an exhaustive list, but they should help demonstrate the types of tools at your disposal and the various capabilities they give for data-driven social media marketers who are willing to leverage them.

As you continue your path towards becoming a data-driven marketer, stay focused on constantly working with tools like these to develop new insights and to test your assumptions. If you are diligent with your implementation, you will quickly realize the benefits of incorporating data into your social media marketing.